These are the native, naturalized, rare, heirloom, collectable, and very well-adapted bulbs we grow here in Solas Gardens from all over the world! These are available at different times of the year, please check the "Home" section for current availability and next shipping schedule.

 

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The Texas Native Bulbs:


Allium canadense var fraseri

 

alliumThis Texas native allium has a clear white bloom starting in April in our gardens. It prefers a drier, well drained location in our garden and can be easily tucked around other perennials or annuals. Bloom height is 18" and this is really a "no-care" plant in our gardens! This is definitely NOT an invasive allium and is terrific for the Southern USA. Recommeded for zones 8-9b.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hymenocallis liriosme

Texas Spider Lily

 

This plant was first identified by Shiner in 1951 and is native to East Texas, Louisiana, Coastal Mississippi, and Coastal Alabama to Mobile Bay. Texas Spider Lily has huge (up to 7” across), tantalizingly-fragrant white flowers that bloom mid-summer with narrow bright green leaves. While Hymencallis liriosme prefers an acidic, boggy growing environment (it’s naturally found in swamps!) we have friends in Mississippi that grow this species in much humus-enriched acidic upland soil that is just kept wet as much as possible. Recommended for growing in zones 8-10.

 crinum

Crinum americanum

American Spider Lily

 

This plant was first identified by Linnaeus in 1752 and is native all along the Gulf Coast from Texas to Florida. The  flower scapes have 4-8 white blooms and the blunt-shaped leaves are erect. It prefers an acidic, boggy soil (it's naturally found in swamps!) but happily tolerates an acidic humus-enriched wet setting in our gardens. It is also surprisingly drought tolerant in late summers when well established.  Crinum americanum blooms in July for us and is an excellent bulb for beginner's to start a study (or obsession) of crinum species. Recommended for growing in zones 8-10. 

 

Nemastylis geminiflora

Prairie Celestial

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The Prairie Celestial is native to Tennessee and Mississippi west to Texas and North to Kansas and Missouri; and is very widespread on the black land Texas prairies and all around the hill country. It is naturally found in grasslands and prairies, and also occurs in piney woods. This bulb grows deep (about 5”) and blooms in shades of sky-blue (rarely white) with white at the bloom base and yellow anthers. The flowers open mid-morning and fade before sundown and can grow in full sun to partial shade. Prairie Celestial’s are a delightful and delicate bloomer 6-12” high in March through May in our gardens and prefer dry conditions during their dormancy; a little tempermental, but essential for any collection of native Texas bulbs.Recommended for growing in zones 6-9.

 

Manfreda maculosa

Deciduous Agave

 

This is a low growing native of south Texas with rosettes of succulent blue-green toothed leaves sporting an abundance of maroon colored spots. The plants reach a maximum height and width of one foot, which makes them the perfect size for most garden and container settings. The tubular two-foot tall blooms open greenish-white and fade reddish-pink as they age. Manfreda manculosa grows from brittle underground rhizomes and needs a very well drained soil with full sun to partial shade. It becomes deciduous to survive droughts and can survive serious freezes without damage once established in the garden. Chopped rhizomes of Manfreda manculosa were once used as a source of soap and shampoo in Texas. Caterpillars of the rare Manfreda Giant Skipper (Stallingsia maculosa) depend on this plant as a food source. Recommended for growing in zones 7-9. Shipped in deep quart pots--another must-have native Texas bulb/plant!

 

 

Herbertia lahue

Prairie Nymphs

 

excellentPrairie Nymphs are an iris relative native to Texas and are lovely bluish-violet subtropical spring-flowering bulbs with a white flower eyes. This petite species has narrow green foliage less than 6” in height making it an excellent candidate for container gardening. Prairie Nymphs like medium moisture levels, are best grown in full sun to partial shade, and bloom in our gardens from March through April. When given adequate moisture, they prove to be easy and reliable naturalizing bulbs that reward their owners by reproducing remarkably easily from seed. Recommended for growing in zones 8-9.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 


 

 

Oxalis drummondi

Wood Sorrel


oneThis delicate bloomer was first identified by A. Gray and is native to Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. A fall flowering, winter-growing stoloniferous bulb with three leaflets and and violet-pink flowers in four to eight flowering umbels. It begins blooming for us in August and continues blooming sporadically throughout the fall into early winter. Wood Sorrel makes a great potted specimen plant with it's delicate flowers. Likes it on the shady side. Recommended for growing in zones 8-9.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schoenocaulon texanum 
Texas Green Lily

 

schpolean.JPGThis species was first identified by Scheele and are native in limestone soil in slopes, canyons, outwashes, and flats from the northeastern Rio Grande plains to the hill country and Edwards Plateau of Texas. Texas Green Lily blooms in the fall for us with tiny greenish flowers and have extruded pinkish stamens and a faint sweet scent. Not showy but very interesting. The grassy leaves remain in active growth for most of the year and the plants are not invasive. They can be planted in a poor, dry spot, where they will persist; but we grow them in clay pots to ensure the well-drained conditions they need to thrive. Every Texas native bulb collection should contain this interesting native! Recommended for growing in zones 8-9.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Heirloom Garden Bulbs:

 


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Rhodophiala bifida
Oxblood Lily or Hurricane Lily or Schoolhouse Lily

This bulb was first identified by Herbert and later clarified by Traub in 1953;  and is native to Argentina, Uraguay, and Southern Brazil where they naturally occur in shades of red, orange, purple, pink, and even rarely, in white. Oxblood Lilies are considered an heirloom bulb in our gardens  because it was first brought to Texas and spread by the early German settlers around central Texas in the 1800's. It is very easy to grow and is Texas tough as nails, easily withstanding both droughts and deluges in our gardens where we have grown it for over 20 years. The red form is the most widely distributed, but we grow both the classic red and a pink form. The long-necked black coated bulbs grow deeply, and if planted shallowly they will pull themselves down to their chosen level by contractile roots. They are hysteranthous (that means flowering-before leaves appear) and flower on naked stems around late August or usually early September (right around labor day) after a rain. Ours are blood red and somewhat resemble  a miniature amaryllis;  but with dark green, narrow foliage during the fall (after flowering), winter, and spring. They prefer full sun or deciduous shade during their growing season and are completely dormant for us by the end of May.  The height of the flower scape  is about 12" or slightlymore. They never require dividing; but if we do, they gladly thank us by reproducing from offsets! Recommended for growing in zones 7-9.
 

 

Rhodophiala bifida

Pink form of Oxblood Lily

 

This is simply the pink form of Rhodophiala bifada we grow at Solas Gardens and all information is identical to that found above. Recommended for growing in zones 7-9.

 

 

 

 

 

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x Amarcrinum or x Crinodonna

A genetic cross between Amaryllis belladonna and Crinum moorei. This bulb blooms for us from the end of May until the middle of August making it a staple in our garden. It blooms with 10-16 funnel-shaped pink blooms which retain the spicy-sweet belladonna fragrance. The Crinodonna has the same basic cultural requirements of a crinum replacing true lilies in our garden. The word crinum comes from the Greek crinon which roughly translates as lily. x Amarcrinum or x Crinodonna is thought to be a Southern United States hybrid introduction from about 1925 and should be thought of as a landscape plant, just like a shrub, as it represents a real investment as they  grow/reproduce fairly slowly. The height, when blooming, is 24"-36" and retains large strappy leaves year-round for us. They are large bulbs which grow deeply, are heavy feeders, appreciate at least a half-day of sun, high humidity and rainfall, but well-drained soil. One of the stars of our gardens! A very easy bulb to begin your exploration (or obsession) with crinums. Much hardier and tolerant than most crinum species. Recommended for growing in zones 7-10.

Crinum Hybrid

‘Ellen Bosanquet’

 

This crinum is probably a cross between Crinum scabrum and pollen taken from the crinum hybrid ‘J.C. Harvey’ and was introduced by Louis Bosanquet around 1925. It’s probably one of the more popular crinum hybrids; although its midseason blooms are of a shorter duration than x Amarcrinum in our gardens. Like x Amarcrinum, ‘Ellen Bosanquet'  does increase rapidly and produces a lot of offsets, but it tends to reduce the blooms on the parent plant. The color is a rich wine-red and the scapes are a bit shorter than x Amarcrinum. Recommended for growing in zones 7-10.

 

 

The South American Bulbs: 

 

 

Cypella coelestes
Goblet Flower

This member of the iris family is native to Brazil, Uraguay, and Argentina and has nearly evergreen blue-green foliage for us. It blooms in succession early through late summer on sturdy, airy 2’ stems with 6 petals (3 large blue-lavender and 3 smaller tri-color petals of white, yellow, and blue). Cypella coelestes prefers moist, yet well-drained garden conditions but is surprisingly drought tolerant in late summer . It performs equally well for us in large containers or in the ground. The buds are nearly as beautiful as the blooms as few plants match the exact shade of blue. This species is also very easy from seeds and always blooms for us in its second season. Recommended for growing in zones 7b-9. 

Cypella herbertii

cypella

This member of the iris family is native to Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay and is probably the most popular of the Cypella species having mustard-yellow blooms on sturdy, but airy 2’ stems with wine-brown inner markings. Cypella herbertii prefers full sun and well-drained soil and dry conditions during winter dormancy. It reseeds nicely and often blooms the first year in our gardens from seed. Recommended for growing in zones 8-9. 

Herbertia pulchella

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This native of southern Brazil and Uruguay is a winter growing and spring blooming Iris relative which likes moist soil throughout the year and slightly acidic soils. The blue flowers with a white stripe down each petal start blooming for us in late March and continue blooming until almost May. It needs full sun, acidic soils, and warmer winter temperatures. The plant is very petite, at leass than 9" tall. Recommended for growing in zones 9-10. 

Ipheion uniflorum

 

All the Ipheions and their related subspecies are native to South America (southern Brazil, Chili, and Uruguay) and are called Spring Starflowers. They are great naturalizing bulbs for Texas and the Southern United States. Ipheon uniflorum blooms in a range of colors from white to pale blue at less than 6” high. Ipheion uniflorum and other related Ipheion species bloom early in the season (January through March) in our gardens and have happily naturalized in areas with good drainage for 20 years. We love the Ipheions for their very early spring blooms!  Recommended for growing in zones 5-9.

 

Ipheion uniflorum var violaceum

‘Wisley Blue’

 Wisley

All the Ipheions and their related subspecies are native to South America (southern Brazil, Chili, and Uruguay) and are called Spring Starflowers. They are great naturalizing bulbs for Texas and the Southern United States. Ipheon ‘Wisley Blue’ blooms in a pewter-steel or colonial-blue color at less than 6” high. Ipheion ‘Wisley Blue’ and other related Ipheion species bloom early (January through March) in the season in our gardens and have happily naturalized in areas with good drainage for 20 years. We love the Ipheions for their very early spring blooms!  Recommended for growing in zones 5-9. 

 

Ipheion peregrinans

‘Rolf Fiedler’

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All the Ipheions and their related subspecies are native to South America (southern Brazil, Chili, and Uruguay) and are called Spring Starflowers. They are great naturalizing bulbs for Texas and the Southern United States. Ipheon ‘Rolf Fiedler’ blooms in an electric blue color at less than 6” high. Ipheion ‘Rolf Fiedler’ and other related Ipheion species bloom early (January through March) in the season in our gardens and have happily naturalized in areas with good drainage for 20 years. We love the Ipheions for their very early spring blooms!  Recommended for growing in zones 5-9. 

 

 

Ipheion uniflorum var album

‘Albert Castillo’

 

AlbertoAll the Ipheions and their related subspecies are native to South America (southern Brazil, Chili, and Uruguay) and are called Spring Starflowers. They are great naturalizing bulbs for Texas and the Southern United States. Ipheon ‘Albert Castillo’ blooms in a brilliant pure white color and are larger than most of the Ipheions. Ipheion ‘Albert Castillo’ and other related Ipheion species bloom early (January through March) in the season in our gardens and have happily naturalized in areas with good drainage for 20 years. We love the Ipheions for their very early spring blooms!  Recommended for growing in zones 7-10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ipheion uniflorum var purpuream

‘Froyle Mill’

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All the Ipheions and their related subspecies are native to South America (southern Brazil, Chili, and Uruguay) and are called Spring Starflowers. They are great naturalizing bulbs for Texas and the Southern United States. Ipheon ‘Froyle Mill’ blooms in a large darker purple color than the other Ipheions. Ipheion ‘Froyle Mill’ and other related Ipheion species bloom early (January through March) in the season in our gardens and have happily naturalized in areas with good drainage for 20 years. We love the Ipheions for their very early spring blooms!  Recommended for growing in zones 7-10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nothoscordum felipponei

(formerly  known as Ipheion sellowianum)

sellowianumThis species was first identified by Beauverd in 1921 is native to Uruguay where it is found in slightly acidic clay soil rich in organic matter in areas with year-round rainfall and a brief summer dry spell. This sums up the climate conditions in southeast Texas exactly. It is a dwarf species forms slowly spreading rosettes suitable for containers and rock gardens with honey-scented fragrant bright lemon yellow crocus-shaped flowers. Even though single blooms open prior to noon and close up before sunset; it blooms continuously over a very long period in spring and is rarely seen in garden cultivation. Recommended for growing in zones 8-10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cape Bulbs:

 Freesia Laxa or Anomatheca Laxa 

 laxa

This unique and beautiful rarely grown red spring blooming bulb is native to southern Africa but has naturalized in old homesteads in Florida. Freesia laxa has been in cultivation for 200 years; but is rarely seen in commerce today,  although is an extremely reliable tiny naturalized bulb in our gardens. It blooms in mid-to-late March on 12” stalks red with darker red blotches going completely dormant by early summer. It seems to not be bothered by moisture during its dormancy and provides a welcome respite from yellow narcissus and blue Ipheions in our early spring gardens. This underused little beauty is a rapid reproducer and one of our favorite early spring bulbs! It grows well in full sun or partial shade. Recommended for growing in zones 8b-10.

 

 

 

blueWe also have Freesia laxa in white, blue (Freesia laxa ssp azurea), and the variety known as 'Joan Evans' which is white with a red spot. These are in very limited quantities. 

 

 

 

Freesia laxa ssp azurea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Odds and Ends:

Lycoris radiata var. radiata
Red Spider Lily

 

This bulb was first discovered by Herbert in about 1850 and is native to Japan and China. It was brought to the United States soon after the Civil War and rapidly spread westward by southern gardeners. Ours are the true heirloom form (triploid vigor) and not the newer (dipoid forms) recently imported from Japan. They are hysteranthous (flowering-before leaves appear) and the large red flowers appear on naked stems in September. They are one of the bulbs which actually likes water during their dormancy period and failure to provide it can result in failure to bloom. The showy display of the spider lily lasts for weeks, and once the flowers fade, the foliage lasts all winter. The hysteranthous (flowers prior to leaves appearing) blooms can be seen from great distances and are long lasting as cut flowers. They prefer partial shade and well-drained garden soil. They are fast-growing and quickly form large bulb clumps that can be separated and planted. Another southern garden gem we love to grow in our gardens. Recommended for growing in zones 7-9. 

 

 

Lycoris albiflora

White Spider Lily

 

This species is native to Japan and identified by Koidzumi in 1924 and is probably a natural hybrid between Lycoris radiata and Lycoris aurea. It is a beautiful creamy white form of Lycoris which has a slight peach tint and easy to grow in the Southern United States. It is sterile, but steadily reproduces by offsets. It blooms hysteranthous (flowers prior to leaves appearing) in our gardens from August-September. Recommended for growing in zones 7-10.

 

Lycoris traubii

Golden Spider Lily

auerea.jpg

This Lycoris species was identified by Hayward in 1959 and is native to Taiwan. It is hysteranthous (flowers prior to leaves appearing) and the shiny lanceolate leaves appear about a month later. Height of bloom scape on Lycoris traubii is 2' and it blooms in our gardens in October. Notice how the blooms are held at a 90 degree angle? This distinguishes this heirloom species from Lycoris aurea which has narrower petals than Lycoris traubii which is the true Southern heirloom. Recommended for growing in zones 7-9.

Belamcanda chinensis

Blackberry Lily

 

blackberry.JPGWhile this species is, in fact, native to Japan; it has naturalized far and wide across the southern United States including around old homesteads. The roots are stout rhizomes with broad, iris-like deciduous fans. The flowers have six segments, which are not united, and are commonly orange with red dots; and sometimes yellow. Glassy black seeds resembling a blackberry follow the flowers; hence the common name Blackberry Lily. This species does best in a sandy loam in full to partial shade with plenty of moisture. They are considered short-lived perennials but are very easy to propagate from seed sown in the fall. Recommended for growing in zones 4-9. These are shipped in deep quart pots.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leucojum aestivum
Summer Snowflake


IM000234.JPG
This bulb was first identified by Linnaeus in 1753 and is native to Europe and parts of Asia. This is one of the first bulbs to bloom for us (the name aestivum alludes to summer) in the very early spring, despite its name. We have grown this bulb for over 15 years in our gardens and it usually blooms in early January and February. The plant has strap-like basal leaves with nodding, bell-shaped white flowers, tipped green. This species will thrive in full sun or shade, and prefers a heavy, damp soil but also naturalizes well in drier conditions. It would also do well near ponds and streams; we grow it at the edges of our Louisiana Iris beds. The strappy leaves begin to emerge in December and completely die back by mid-April. It should be put in a location where the late spring "die-back" of the foliage is not too unsightly. Recommended for growing in zones 4-9.